Sites I Use: Digg.com

September 13, 2007

by — Posted in Technology

I’m going to start a series on the main websites I use. Today I’m going to start this series with digg.com.


The first thing I can say is that you haven’t heard of Digg.com where have you been. If you are still a regular slashdot.org user and you’ve never heard of digg.com – your geek card is now revoked.

What is Digg (from wikipedia):

Digg is a community-based popularity website with an emphasis on technology and science articles, recently expanding to a broader range of categories such as politics and entertainment. It combines social bookmarking, blogging, and syndication with a form of non-hierarchical, democratic editorial control.

News stories and websites are submitted by users, and then promoted to the front page through a user-based ranking system. This differs from the hierarchical editorial system that many other news sites employ.

Digg history (from wikipedia):

Digg started out as an experiment in November 2004 by Kevin Rose, Owen Byrne, Ron Gorodetzky, and Jay Adelson (who serves as CEO), all of whom currently play an active role in the management of the site.

Digg, Version 1.6

Digg, Version 1.6

“We started working on developing the site back in October 2004,” Kevin Rose told ZDNet[1] “We started toying around with the idea a couple of months prior to that, but it was early October when we actually started creating what would become the beta version of digg. The site launched to the world on December 5th 2004.”

Kevin Rose’s friend David Prager (The Screen Savers, This Week in Tech) originally wanted to call the site “Diggnation”, but Kevin wanted a simpler name. He chose the name “Digg”, because users are able to “dig” stories, out of those submitted, up to the front page. The site was called “Digg” instead of “Dig” because the domain name “dig.com” was previously registered. “Diggnation” would eventually be used as the title of Kevin Rose and Alex Albrecht‘s weekly podcast.

The original design was free of advertisements, and was designed by Dan Ries. As Digg became more popular, Google AdSense was added to the website. In July 2005, the site was updated to “Version 2.0”. The new “version” featured a friends list, the ability to “digg” a story without being redirected to a “success” page, and a new interface designed by web design company Silverorange [2]. The site developers have stated that in future versions a more minimalist design will likely be employed. On Monday June 26, 2006 version 3 of Digg was released with specific categories for Technology, Science, World & Business, Videos, Entertainment and Gaming as well as a View All section where all categories are merged.

Digg has grown large enough that submissions sometimes create a sudden increase of traffic to the “dugg” website. This is referred to by some Digg users as the “Digg effect” and by some others as the site being “dugg to death”. However, in many cases stories are linked simultaneously on several popular bookmarking sites. In such cases, the impact of the “digg effect” is difficult to isolate and assess.

On August 27, 2007 Digg altered their main interface

Now that I’ve given you the wikipedia history let’s give you some of mine with site – I’ve used digg for over a year and half as my geek news source – slashdot moved to slow for me to get enough of my geek news (I know I’m sad) – so I discovered digg after hearing coworkers and friends talk about it.

I’ve submitted a few stories to digg and I’ve even managed to get one on the front page. This is my sad sad little geek bragging right.

The whole point and problem of digg is that popular stories rise to the top and less interesting stories disappear. If your not using and RSS feed you will miss alot of things that may otherwise have interested you. If your interested in zombie dogs to working lego wii’s these all end up on digg.com.

Now I’m sure I’ve given you all information you already knew but I figured I would start with one of the easiest and most popular sites on the net.

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